A PHILOSOPHICAL STUDY OF VIOLENCE AND POWER IN HANNAH ARENDT’S POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS

  • Justin-Anthony Ekene Anene
  • Kelechi Onyeka Ezeani
Keywords: Violence, Power, Reform, Revolution, Civil Disobedience

Abstract

This study deals with the question of resolving the misuse of political power through violence as the last resort as advocated by Hannah Arendt. However, the resort to oppression and violence by governments that are without authentic power, as Arendt postulates, is certainly visible within contemporary conflict, but, the roots and causes of civil conflicts are arguably inadequately explained. Focusing on her essay On Violence, this study seeks to appraise these concepts and analyze the sharp distinction that Hannah Arendt draws between power and violence. Knowing how power and violence are frequently combined, Hannah Arendt argues that they are conceptually distinct and antithetical. The research problem is that they are interchangeable and therefore confusing in their use of some concepts like social force, authority and power as they feature in the discourse of social and political matters in her age. The method of analysis is employed to analyze and evaluate the contentious distinction between power and violence and harness such analysis and appraisal as a veritable critical perspective for understanding power and violence in our contemporary world.

Published
2021-04-05
Section
Articles